4 Ways Real Estate Investing Could be Making You Money Right Now!

4 Ways Real Estate Could be Making You Money Right Now! Investment Properties, Rentals, Landlors, Cash Flow, Passive, Income, Appreciation, Leverage. http://jessicacoaches.com/2017/03/4-ways-real-estate-investing-could-be-making-you-money-right-now/

“People always need a place to live.”  This was a statement made by my real estate investment mentor.  He had been a real estate investor from the age of 20; he tried all manner of operations, land to single family homes; commercial store fronts to multi-family housing.  Slowly and steadily he weathered the economic climates, and he worked his way to an early retirement at 45.

Countless people are investors in real estate, some small like me who own only seven units, some big who own apartment complexes all over the place.  Some passive who have all their properties managed by someone else, some active who play the role of the property manager.  Real Estate should be in your portfolio.  When held for long times it is steady.  When leveraged the return percentages can be very high.  When fully paid off they are an amazing constant source of income.

An investment property is one that is purchased with the intent of making money.  Your home can build net wealth, but it is not an investment property unless it is multi-unit and you are renting the other units out.

 

1.  Leveraging yourself into a fortune.

Loans are still available at historic lows in the United States, when you compare our rates to the 15% of times past our buying power is stronger than ever.  The advantages of using a loan to purchase real estate are you can take a smaller amount of money to purchase a large asset that yields more money and which puts more money in your pocket every month.  It allows the little guy to get into the game and get great returns.

See:  How to Buy a Property With No or Low Money Down!

 

Rental Investment Properties Rate of Returns Why Two Houses is better than one, the power of leverage

Click to Enlarge.

2. Tax Deductions.

There are three ways to get tax deductions on investment properties.

  • Operating Expenses, these include but are not limited to property management, water bills you pay for the property, and repair costs.
  • Interest on Loans, your loan company will send you a tax form at the end of the year, and it will be a tax deduction.
  • Depreciation (Cost Recovery), this is only for investment properties, not your personal residence, this is an incentive from the government.  This tax incentive is to help counteract the natural wear and tear your investment receives. They deem the economic life of a property to be 27.5 years; the deduction is the properties purchase value divided evenly over that time per year.

 

3. Appreciation.

Real Estate does not have a static value, it changes with the market and time, however, over time almost all real estate in the United States has gained a great deal of value. This is a wonderful thing because it means that for long-term property investment keeps up with inflation and has the potential to yield you a great deal upon sale.

Two things of note:

  • When you invest only for appreciation short term, you are moving into a different investment strategy of speculation.
  • There can be significant capital gains taxes on home sales; please seek advice from a tax specialist for more details on this.

real estate rentals property investment passive income

4. Cash Flow.

This is my personal favorite of the four ways I am making money from real estate right now.  Cash flow is the reason people call Real Estate investing a passive income, and I would personally call it a mostly passive income.  Cash flow is the money that is generated from your asset in excess of the costs.  I use a conservative estimate of half of your rent going to losses, repairs, vacancies, and costs.  Many people use this to pay off additional on the mortgage, save for another investment, or just fund their life.

 

Are you ready to buy an investment property?  Get PreQualified before you talk to a Realtor!

Our Story: The Road to Being a Worldschooling Family of Five!

ADVENTURE, BIG, EARLY, EDVENTURE, FAMILY, INCOME, PASSIVE, RENTALS, RETIRED, RETIREMENT, ROAD, SCHOOL, SCHOOLING, TRAVEL, TRAVELING, WORLD, WORLDSCHOOLING http://jessicacoaches.com/2017/03/our-story-the-road-to-being-a-worldschooling-family-of-five

My husband and I have traveled extensively, both independently before we met, and then together. Our first Christmas together was in Paris, our first valentines day we had dinner on a beach in Cambodia with children running by with sparklers. We have the travel bug. If you know what this bug feels like, you will understand that staying in one place for a long time can be painful. You can feel like you have to ignore a part of yourself, because no one else tends to understand it. It feels like being a bird in a cage. Luckily, I have been a lovebird with my perfect match with me, but it has been stifling for both of us.

The History:

When we got pregnant with our first child, we did not have location independent jobs, and we had been working our way around the world using HelpX and WWOOF. We decided we didn’t want to live by the seat of our pants with children; we needed to know everyone would be clothed and fed. So, we headed back to the United States and began settling down into a more ‘normal’ life. We both had given up our higher paying jobs when we left to go travel, and when we came back it was 2009, no one was hiring, it felt like we were starting all over again.

The plan begins. We stumbled upon Rich Dad, Poor Dad. Our vision: We would get enough rentals to give us location independent income wherever in the world we were at, we would be set for retirement, and not have to worry about not contributing to our IRA, 401Ks, and mutual funds, unless we wanted to.

See:  How I never have to pay another penny for my retirement at age 34 on a 30,000 per year salary!

We have now been back in the United States for close to nine years now. We have three beautiful boys now. We are so close to our goal we can taste it! What does that goal look like? $2500 of passive or location independent income per month. Enough to ensure we do not go without food or housing for our whole family in most developed places and live very nicely in places with lower cost of living. But, have you ever been so close to your goal but not been able to realize it? It is excruciating! It makes you want to rush, maybe skimp just a little. So we have set a date to leave, my husbands 40th birthday, which gives us a clear defined date to focus on to get us where we need to be.

See:  Pathway to Financial Freedom Report!!! -Q2 2017

 

What our future looks like:

We plan to slow travel; we will move to a place and live there for a few months if we like the area, trying to use the full length of our tourist visas. We like the beach, so we will try to stay near it most of the time. Since we are so close to the border of Mexico in Tucson, AZ. We plan on just taking our van and heading south and stopping for a few months when we see a place we like. Slow travel and using vehicle will help to keep costs down. Have you ever bought airline tickets for five???

worldschooling

Worldschooling:

As for our children, we plan to worldschool. What is that you say? It is like homeschooling but using where you are to be the catalyst for what topics to be teaching. My husband was homeschooled, and I once upon a time was a scientist, so I feel we will be able to be competent worldschoolers. We, however, will adjust our plans if needed, nothing is more important to us then our children’s wellbeing. But, for now, I will just dream of my little polygots, talking to other children about world history, economics, and current events.

Here is our planned route, this will take several years:

How to Buy a Property With No or Low Money Down!

How to buy a property with no or low money down investment real estate http://jessicacoaches.com/2017/03/how-to-buy-a-property-with-no-or-low-money-down/

Most of us have heard that it is smart to have 20% downpayment to purchase a home.  And it is.  Your payments will be lower, less interest will be paid over the course of the loan with a large downpayment.  However, if you are using these loans as a vehicle to purchase an investment, meaning not just a place to live but to make money, it can be a wise choice for a variety of reasons.  There are also people who just prefer to own a home, though sometimes it does not make sense.  Check out this article about the pros and cons of homeownership:  What you need to know before you buy a home!

Loan Types

1. FHA – Federal Housing Administration. 3.5% Downpayment.
Pros: Low down payment, good for up to 4 unit properties, accepts lower credit scores.
Cons: MIP (Mortgage Insurance Premium)  this is additional insurance you must purchase and pay monthly with your mortgage which lowers buying power.  If you are competing with other offers with everything but the financing being the same, FHA tends not to get the contract.  This is because FHA loans have a base quality standards the house must maintain to loan on it, and the lender will often require repairs.

 
Can I get an FHA Loan? LendingTree.com
 

2. VA – Department of Veterans Affairs Loans 0% Downpayment
Pros: No down payment, good for up to four unit properties, mortgage insurance is only a one-time premium which gets wrapped into the loan.
Cons: None to speak of.  If you have access to a VA loan you should have a house.

 

3. Insured Conventional – 3% Downpayment
Pros: Low down payment, good for up to four units
Cons: Not as widely advertised, PMI (Premium Mortgage Insurance), this is additional insurance you must purchase and pay monthly with your mortgage which lowers buying power.

 

4. Seller Financing (Seller Carryback, Land Contract) – terms vary widely but can be low or no downpayment.
Pros:  You are dealing with a person so you may be able to negotiate your terms as there are no standards anyone is being held to. Closing fees will be lower as the mortgage company will not be charging fees such as the origination fee.  You can sometimes get this type of financing with lower credit scores.
Cons: They are harder to find, most people just want all the cash up front when they sell.  The interest rates can be much higher than standard loans.  When you default on a seller financed home the property reverts to the owner and does not go through a standard foreclosure or trustee auction.

 

5. USDA Rural Loans – 0% downpayment
Pros: No downpayment, low-interest rates, not just rural also encompasses small towns, available to people who would normally not qualify for loans.
Cons: There are strict property and borrower restrictions.  Check those out here: https://www.rd.usda.gov/programs-services/single-family-housing-direct-home-loans

  

Related: How I never have to pay another penny for my retirement at age 34 on a 30,000 per year salary!

Additional ways to keep up front costs down

1. Negotiate in 3% closing cost coverage into your purchase offer.  This will cover all other fees and leave you with just the down payment.  Be considerate of the seller though and know that this is worse for the seller then selling the property for 3% less due to commissions.

 

2. Purchase a HomePath.com property.  These are foreclosures and short sales.  They have low 3% down payments and often give 3% in closing costs.  They also work to accommodate the first time buyer, giving some homes owner occupant preference and try to make it easier to qualify for.

 

3. Pathway to Purchase Programs.  This program may or may not be renewed with the changes in the government.  It was downpayment assistance program.  There are income and purchase price limits, but they are relatively high.  There is a limitation to what cities the program is in.  For Tucson, AZ they would give up to $20,000 toward your mortgage.

 

4. NHF Grants (National Homebuyers Fund Inc.). http://www.nhfloan.org/programs/index.shtml   Non-repayable grants up to 5% of the mortgage amount.  Not available in all states.  Low to moderate income requirements.

 

5. Other Downpayment assistance programs.   Check out  http://downpaymentresource.com for a search of programs you could be eligible for.

 

6. Ask your lender to see what fees they will waive.  I have found the big lenders more willing to waive fees than small lenders.  Small lenders tend to work harder to get borderline qualifiers into loans though!

 


Do you have any experience with any of these?  Any that I missed?

I never have to pay into my retirement again!

How I never have to pay another penny for my retirement at 34 on a 30,000 per year salary. Financial Freedom. early retirement travel money real estate rentals investment fire money http://jessicacoaches.com/2017/03/never-pay-retirement-again/
How I never have to pay another penny for my retirement at 34 on a 30,000 per year salary. Financial Freedom. early retirement travel money real estate rentals investment fire money http://jessicacoaches.com/2017/03/never-pay-retirement-again/

That is right, if I decided to hold all my current investments and not pay another cent into my retirement, I could retire comfortably at 65.  What is my secret you may wonder?  Well, it isn’t a secret, this is a proven wealth building strategy that has been used for a very long time.  The only difference from then to now is it is easier to get into the game.

Here it is:  I have someone else investing in my retirement for me.

 

I am a real estate investor.  In particular a buy and hold rental property investor.  What this means is, I buy properties with the intention of keeping it forever, and renting it out to others.  Not only are my renters paying my mortgage, giving me more net worth every month by paying my principle down.   They are also giving me extra to set aside for rental management, repairs, and cash flow which can be used now for life or to get to that retirement faster.

 

If we just held everything we have now at our current rents we would have $3,700 dollars of monthly income at 64 which is when our longest mortgage finishes at.  This is a conservative estimate, paying for property management, capital expenses (big repairs averaged over time), and vacancies.  The best part, rent keeps up with inflation.  So $3,700 today will be the equivalent in the market in 2047.  Which for us would be a very comfortable lifestyle for us.

 

 

So how did a family on a 30,000 salary start real estate investing?  Houses are expensive!

 

Our six-part strategy to fast tracking our retirement:

 

1. Finding a property that needed fixing up and getting a good deal.

 

2. Choosing a property that had at least two units so we could live in one and rent the other out to help cover our costs. See:  House Hacking: Lets You Get Your Housing For Free

 

3. We leveraged ourselves with owner-occupied, low-downpayment, mortgages.   See:  How to Buy a Property With No or Low Money Down!

 

4. We lived in the unit we were renovating doing as much of the work ourselves as possible.  

 

5. We went slow.  This is not a story of buying four properties in one year.  We have been at this for six years and have three multi-unit properties.

 

6. We managed our money, we didn’t let our money manage us.  See: Are you tired of worrying about money?

 

 

Lessons from our first rental property:

 

-Don’t over improve the property for the area.  When you are living in something you tend to fix it up for you, don’t improve it to your standards, improve it to just above the average standard for a rental in your area.  You will be more worried about what renters will do to your property, and you just don’t get the money back.

 

-Rental properties are a numbers game.   Make sure you get all the data and give yourself a conservative cushion to make sure it will be a profitable rental after renovations.

 

-Separate the electricity between the units if it is not already done.  It is just so much more hassle to provide utilities included!

 

-It is better to jump in on something you think is good, than wait for perfect. Even though our first purchase was not the ideal purchase, it still built us wealth and taught us an innumerable amount of things.  It was better to jump in with some basic knowledge than procrastinating finding the perfect property.

 

Now, I don’t have to invest another penny in my retirement, but I am going to! A retirement age of 65 seems so far off and I think with dedication I am going to try to retire before my husband hits 40, which gives us….. just less than 2 years.  Think we can do it?

 

Do you have rental properties? Or are you wanting to get in the game?

Pathway to Financial Freedom Report!!! -Q2 2017

Income Report pathway to financial freedom report passive income investment real estate rentals travel full time http://jessicacoaches.com/2017/03/pathway-to-financial-freedom-report-q2-2017/
My family of five are on the road to financial freedom.  What that means to us is Mr. and Mrs. JessicaCoaches will no longer have to work time for money jobs!  Our goal is to get $2500 in cash flow and a nice cash buffer so we feel safe to say goodbye to the 9 to 5 and hello to more freedom and traveling!  This does not mean we will not be working, just that we get to choose what we do and where we do it.  We have done this on a very modest income, clawing our way forward, buying fixer upper properties, living in them, fixing them up ourselves, and then renting them out.

 


Rental A: 890/month average cash flow
Pros: Very hands-off income, fully managed, vacation rental allows us to stay there too.
Cons: Income is very variable and sporadic, get left holding a lot of bills while waiting to get paid.  Home is fully paid for and at peak earning capacity for us as we do not self-manage it, equity could be better spent elsewhere.  We likely over improved this rental.
Plans: Sell, possible owner financing, or finance to place equity elsewhere.

 

Rental B: 140/month cash flow
Pros: Very hands-off income, fully managed.  60k from being fully paid off and at that point will be looking at 1000/month cash flow unoptimized.  No vacancies in 5 years, rents a little low due to this.
Cons: Looking at some renovations when current occupants leave.  Could be making higher returns on money invested in another place.  Needs some improvements in order to refinance or sell.
Plans: Hold.

 

Rental C: 995/month rent no cash flow as we are living and finishing up renovation in main unit.
Pros: Best returns on investment, potential 82% cash on cash return.  Looking at 550/month cash flow when both units rented out and managed.  200k to payoff and 1750/month cash flow.
Cons: Still needs some more work, need to be careful not to over improve.
Plans: Hold and rent fully when we leave.

 

Blog: No Cash Flow, in negatives I do not wish to calculate out yet! ( I think I made $0.27 cents on my sidebar ad.)
Pros: Great growth potential, really learning a lot.
Cons: Quite a bit of time for no upfront rewards yet as I am new.
Plans: Work into affiliate marketing without being sleazy, finish book and market.

 

Coaching: 200/month
Pros: I enjoy it, location independent.
Cons: Can be emotionally exhausting.
Plans: Take on 2 more clients.

 

Negative Cash flow!
Renovation Debt:
550/month 4% interest, 3.5 years remaining, 20k balance.
Pros: Low interest.
Cons: Could hold back our financial freedom date.
Plans: Payoff with change in rental A.

 

Summary:
$1230 cash flow if traveling now and renting out our current residence.  We are close to half way there.  Potential goals/plans to get us there!
1. Refinance out negative 550 debt.
2. Buy another rental property.
3. Get better returns on Rental A through sale or finance.
4. Blog and Coaching increase.
5. Increase salaries to push us further faster!